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Law School News

Finding things tough and need a listening ear?

Life as a law student can be tough at times…..

If you are finding things difficult and would like to talk to someone, your Student Welfare Officer, Su Cassidy will be available in A221 (College Building second floor, near spiral staircase) at the following times:

Tuesdays           1.00-3.00 pm

Wednesdays      2.00-4.00 pm

Fridays               10.00 am-12.00

You can book an appointment with Su at another time or at Gray’s Inn Place by emailing cls.support@city.ac.uk

Law School news posted by Emily on Sun 25 Nov, 2018

Accessing the FT online

Those of you wanting to improve your commercial awareness will know that the Financial Times is a useful tool for this.

Those of you who already have an account with ft.com will now need to re-register.

If you're new to City and would like to register for an ft.com account, please follow the info provided via the library website.

Law School news posted by Emily on Thu 14 Sep, 2017

Need to use another library to find materials?

Read all about the Sconul Access scheme via the City Library Services website.

Law School news posted by Emily on Mon 4 Sep, 2017
Future Lawyer blog

Current Awareness Headlines

News feed syndicated from Inner Temple Library.

Upcoming Law Events

  • Calendar event

    Justice for all and how to achieve it

    30th October 2019

    30th October 2019
    Justice for all and how to achieve it

    Event Time: 6:30-8:30pm

    Venue: City 125 Suite, Whiskin Street Building City, University of London Whiskin Street London EC1V 0HB

    Guest Speaker: Sir Geoffrey Nice QC

     

    Sir Geoffrey Nice QC has practised as a barrister since 1971.  He worked at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia – the ICTY – between 1998 and 2006 and led the prosecution of Slobodan Miloševic, former President of Serbia. Much of his work since has been connected to cases before the permanent International Criminal Court – Sudan, Kenya, Libya – or  pro bono for victims groups – Iran, Burma, North Korea – whose cases cannot get to any international court.  He works for several related NGO’s and lectures and commentates in the media in various countries on international war crimes issues.  He has been a part-time judge since 1984 sitting at the Old Bailey and has sat as judge in other jurisdictions, tribunals and inquiries.  Between 2009 and 2012 he was Vice-Chair of the Bar Standards Board, the body that regulates barristers.

    ~ A drinks reception will follow ~

    Book your ticket via City Events

    [External Link]

    Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
  • Calendar event

    Brexit meets its Halloween? Assessing the Immediate Future for the UK and the EU

    31st October 2019

    31st October 2019
    Brexit meets its Halloween? Assessing the Immediate Future for the UK and the EU

    Event Time: 6:30-8pm

    Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building (LSE)

    October 31st has been set as the new deadline by which the UK will formally cease being a member of the European Union. By this stage, we may have a new Brexit agreement or a “no-deal”. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law.

    • Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge.
    • Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is an economist and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service.
    • Sir Ivan Rogers is the Former UK Permanent Representative to the EU.
    • Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE.
    • Kevin Featherstone is Professor in European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory, European Institute, LSE.

    Entry is free and on a first-come, first-served basis. More info at LSE Events.

    [External Link]

    Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
  • Calendar event

    #MeToo: Past and Present

    25th November 2019

    25th November 2019
    #MeToo: Past and Present

    Event Time: 6pm

    Venue: ELG01 Drysdale Building City, University of London Northampton Square London EC1V 0HB

    A panel organised by the Gender & Sexualities Research Centre at City with Karen Boyle (Strathclyde) Julie Wheelwright (City) and respondents Sarah Banet-Weiser (LSE) and Jack Bratich (Rutgers)

    Our speakers will discuss #MeToo in long historical perspective, from Mata Hari to contemporary media.

    Karen Boyle, On silence breaking

    In December 2017, Time magazine named the “Silence Breakers” – the women, and some men, speaking out about sexual harassment – their “person” of the year. This paper re-considers mediatized silence breaking in relation to a longer history of feminist speak outs, and critically examines the way in which feminism (and feminists) featured both in the 2017 stories and in Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey’s subsequent account of breaking the Weinstein story in She Said.

    Julie Wheelwright, From Mata Hari to #MeToo: Reflections on Seduction, Harassment and Sexual Shame

    A few months before the New York Times broke the story about Harvey Weinstein paying off his accusers for decades in 2017, a new publication of Mata Hari’s letters provided a historic perspective on the sexual harassment of female performers. Coinciding with the centenary of Margaretha Zelle MacLeod’s execution on espionage charges by the French on 15 October 1917, this presentation explores the contemporary relevance of her rejection of victimhood and sexual shame.

    About the speakers

    Karen Boyle is Professor of Feminist Media Studies at the University of Strathclyde. She is author of Media and Violence: Gendering the Debates (Sage) and Everyday Pornography (Routledge). Her new book #MeToo, Weinstein and Feminism is out soon with Palgrave.

    Julie Wheelwright is Director of the Creative Writing MA at City and author of The Fatal Lover: Mata Hari and the Myth of Women in Espionage (Harper Collins) and Amazons and Military Maids: Women Who Dressed as Men in Pursuit of Life, Liberty and Happiness (Pandora).

    Sarah Banet-Weiser is Professor and Head of the Dept of Media and Communications at LSE. Her most recent book is Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny (Duke) and the article ‘From Pick-Up Artists to Incels: Con(fidence) Games, Networked Misogyny and the Failure of Neoliberalism’ with Jack Bratich

    Jack Bratich is Associate Professor of Journalism & Media Studies at Rutgers. His work on social media and social theory includes the book Conspiracy Panics: Political Rationality and Popular Culture (SUNY).

    Free event but you need to book via City Events.

    [External Link]

    Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
  • Calendar event

    100 years of women in law

    28th November 2019

    28th November 2019
    100 years of women in law

    Event Time: 6-7pm

    Venue: Barnard's Inn Hall Holborn London EC1N 2HH

    A Gresham lecture that Delahunty gave in November 2017 was one of the first public identifications of the exodus of experienced women from the self-employed Bar - and gave a call for action. That loss affects the number of women who take Silk and that, in turn, drains the pool from which judges are largely drawn. 

    In 2018 the Bar Council and Specialist Bar Associations acknowledged the issue and a “Retention of Women at the Bar’ survey was launched. It’s time to look at the results and test how the legal profession has responded to the challenge.

    No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
    Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 


    Find out more about the event and speaker, Professor Jo Delahunty QC via the Gresham website.

    [External Link]

    Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019
Tue 22 October, 2019
BACFI working at the Employed bar

22nd October 2019
BACFI working at the Employed bar

Event Time: 6pm (registration from 5:30)

Venue: Lecture Theatre, City Law School, Atkin Building, Grays Inn

BACFI Presents in conjunction with the Employed Bar Committee of the Bar Council

Students’ Evening

Come along and find out what employed barristers do.

Panel to include:

  • Lady Hale, BACFI President
  • Patrick Rappo (DLA Piper)
  • Lucinda Orr (Enyo Law)
  • Alexandria Carr (HSBC)

Attendance at the seminar is free but you must register beforehand due to limited spaces.

To register or if you have any queries please email events@bacfi.org or call 01525 222 244

Event posted by Emily on Thu 19 September, 2019
Thu 24 October, 2019
Life as a civil fraud lawyer (with RPC)

24th October 2019
Life as a civil fraud lawyer (with RPC)

Event Time: 5:30-8:30pm

Venue: RPC offices, London

Lawyers from RPC’s civil fraud team, one of the largest and most highly rated in the City, will form the panel for Legal Cheek’s latest student event. They will be joined by a leading fraud barrister from Hardwicke.

RPC acts for individuals, corporates and insolvency office holders on large-scale, complex corporate investigations and fraud-related disputes (litigation and arbitration) in every region of the world. Indeed, although mostly conducted in the English courts, the majority of the firm’s fraud work involves a cross-border element. Hardwicke’s civil fraud and asset tracing team has similar and complimentary expertise.

The speakers will explain what it’s like to practice in this area, share anecdotes from some of their most interesting cases and look ahead to a potentially busy next few years.

They will reflect too on their own career journeys and offer advice to those hoping to follow in their footsteps. After the panel session there will be drinks and networking.

Those wanting to attend need to apply with a CV. See full details via the Legal Cheek website.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 9 October, 2019
Sat 26 October, 2019
The Pupillage Fair

26th October 2019
The Pupillage Fair

Event Time: 10-4

Venue: Bush House, Strand, London, WC2R 1ES

The Pupillage Fair is the only recruitment fair run by the Bar, for the Bar of the future, and is free to attend. It forms a key part of the Bar's commitment to fair access and to a meritocratic culture, regardless of background. The 2018 event was attended by over 70 chambers, employed Bar organisations and Bar affiliated organisations; and by over 400 barristers. More than 2000 students registered to attend the fair.

Go to the Bar Council website to book your place and view the programme.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 19 September, 2019
Tue 29 October, 2019
Developing your legal career internationally

29th October 2019
Developing your legal career internationally

Event Time: 6:30-9pm

Venue: City, University of London Atkin Lecture Theatre 4 Gray's Inn Square London WC1R 5DX

An evening with global legal practitioners, including:

  • Richard Clayton QC (commercial)
  • Prof Christine Goodman (academia)
  • Shivani Jegarajah (human rights)
  • Anesta Weekes QC (crime)

Free but you need to book on Eventbrite.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 10 October, 2019
Wed 30 October, 2019
The view from the bench: in conversation with Supreme Court Justice, Lady Black of Derwent

30th October 2019
The view from the bench: in conversation with Supreme Court Justice, Lady Black of Derwent

Event Time: 6:30-8pm

Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building (LSE)

On this, her first visit to LSE, Lady Black will speak about her work as a judge, reflecting on her career in the law. 

Jill Margaret Black was appointed to the UK Supreme Court in 2017, only the second female judge to reach the position. Lady Black attended Penrhos College in North Wales before studying at Durham University. The first lawyer in her family, her initial career at the Bar involved a broad range of criminal and civil work, although she later specialised in family law. For a period in the 1980s she taught law at Leeds Polytechnic. She was a founding author of the definitive guide to family law practice in England and Wales, and continues to serve as a consulting editor. Lady Black was appointed to the High Court in 1999, assigned to the Family Division. In 2004 she became the Chairman of the Judicial Studies Board's Family Committee, until her appointment as a Judicial Appointments Commissioner in 2008, where she served until 2013. Lady Black was appointed a Lady Justice of Appeal in 2010. She was previously Head of International Family Justice.

  • Zimran Samuel is a Visiting Fellow at LSE and a Barrister at Doughty Street Chambers.
  • Conor Gearty (@conorgearty) is a Professor of Human Rights Law in the Department of Law at LSE. 

Entry is free and on a first-come, first-served basis - for more info see LSE Events.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
Wed 30 October, 2019
Justice for all and how to achieve it

30th October 2019
Justice for all and how to achieve it

Event Time: 6:30-8:30pm

Venue: City 125 Suite, Whiskin Street Building City, University of London Whiskin Street London EC1V 0HB

Guest Speaker: Sir Geoffrey Nice QC

 

Sir Geoffrey Nice QC has practised as a barrister since 1971.  He worked at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia – the ICTY – between 1998 and 2006 and led the prosecution of Slobodan Miloševic, former President of Serbia. Much of his work since has been connected to cases before the permanent International Criminal Court – Sudan, Kenya, Libya – or  pro bono for victims groups – Iran, Burma, North Korea – whose cases cannot get to any international court.  He works for several related NGO’s and lectures and commentates in the media in various countries on international war crimes issues.  He has been a part-time judge since 1984 sitting at the Old Bailey and has sat as judge in other jurisdictions, tribunals and inquiries.  Between 2009 and 2012 he was Vice-Chair of the Bar Standards Board, the body that regulates barristers.

~ A drinks reception will follow ~

Book your ticket via City Events

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Thu 31 October, 2019
Brexit meets its Halloween? Assessing the Immediate Future for the UK and the EU

31st October 2019
Brexit meets its Halloween? Assessing the Immediate Future for the UK and the EU

Event Time: 6:30-8pm

Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building (LSE)

October 31st has been set as the new deadline by which the UK will formally cease being a member of the European Union. By this stage, we may have a new Brexit agreement or a “no-deal”. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law.

  • Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge.
  • Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is an economist and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service.
  • Sir Ivan Rogers is the Former UK Permanent Representative to the EU.
  • Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE.
  • Kevin Featherstone is Professor in European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory, European Institute, LSE.

Entry is free and on a first-come, first-served basis. More info at LSE Events.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
Mon 4 November, 2019
Parliamentary Scrutiny of Law Reform: Procedures, bodies and methods

4th November 2019
Parliamentary Scrutiny of Law Reform: Procedures, bodies and methods

Event Time: 2-5:30pm

Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

The Sir William Dale Centre for Legislative Studies is pleased to announce the

Fifth Law Reform Project Workshop

Opening welcome and introduction
Enrico Albanesi, Associate Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Genova, and IALS Associate Research Fellow, University of London
Jonathan Teasdale, IALS Associate Research Fellow, University of London
Co-leaders of the Project 

Parliamentary scrutiny of law reform. A House of Lords’ perspective
Andrew Makower, Clerk of Legislation, Legislation Office, House of Lords
John Turner, Clerk of Legislation, Legislation Office, House of Lords 

Parliamentary scrutiny of law reform. A House of Commons’ perspective
Liam Laurence Smyth, Clerk of Legislation, Public Bill Office, House of Commons 

Parliamentary follow-up of Law Commission Bills. An Irish Law Reform Commission’s perspective
Ciarán Burke, Former Director of Research, Irish Law Reform Commission 

Coffee break

Parliamentary scrutiny of law reform in Albania
Oriola Sallavaci, Essex University Law School

Law reform and the role of Parliaments in the Arab region
Sara Razai, Judicial Institute, Faculty of Laws, University College of London 

Free but you need to book via the IALS.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Thu 7 November, 2019
From canon to confusion: is our statute book fit for purpose?

7th November 2019
From canon to confusion: is our statute book fit for purpose?

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

Speaker:  Dylan Hughes, First Legislative Counsel, Office of the Legislative Counsel, Welsh Government

Synopsis:
In recent decades statute law has increasingly been overriding the common law, often replacing long established and well understood principles. But are perceived benefits of legislation, such as clarity and comprehensiveness, being compromised by a proliferation of often lengthy, complex and interdependent statutes.

Event is free but you need to book via IALS Events

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Wed 13 November, 2019
Code and Conduct: the future of legal professions

13th November 2019
Code and Conduct: the future of legal professions

Event Time: 6:30-8pm

Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building (LSE)

Advances in IT have had a significant impact on lawyering and law. How can we harness the transformative power of digitalisation without sacrificing law’s humanity?

In this roundtable discussion, we reflect on information technology’s transformative impact on lawyering and on law. Advances in IT have already had a significant impact on how the legal professions are organised and how justice is dispensed. The rate of change is only likely to increase in the coming decades, potentially transforming the nature of lawyering and of law itself in an irreversible way. This discussion is an opportunity to take stock of past achievements and failures, and to reflect on the fundamental importance of harnessing the transformative power of digitalisation without sacrificing law’s humanity. The discussion will be organised in three themes: IT and transformation of the working environment in legal practice; IT and transformation of adjudicative processes; IT and transformation of access to justice. 

  • Christina Blacklaws is the immediate past president of the Law Society and Chair of government technology panels.
  • Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE.
  • Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is Associate Professor, LSE.
  • Eva Micheler is Associate Professor, LSE.
  • Lord Reed is incoming President of the UK Supreme Court.
  • Richard Susskind (@richardsusskind) is Technology Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice.
  • Andrew Murray (@AndrewDMurray) is Professor of Law at LSE’s Department of Law.

Entry is free and on a first-come, first-served basis. For more info see LSE Events.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
Thu 28 November, 2019
100 years of women in law

28th November 2019
100 years of women in law

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: Barnard's Inn Hall Holborn London EC1N 2HH

A Gresham lecture that Delahunty gave in November 2017 was one of the first public identifications of the exodus of experienced women from the self-employed Bar - and gave a call for action. That loss affects the number of women who take Silk and that, in turn, drains the pool from which judges are largely drawn. 

In 2018 the Bar Council and Specialist Bar Associations acknowledged the issue and a “Retention of Women at the Bar’ survey was launched. It’s time to look at the results and test how the legal profession has responded to the challenge.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 


Find out more about the event and speaker, Professor Jo Delahunty QC via the Gresham website.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019
Thu 28 November, 2019
English Law under Two Elizabeths: The Elizabethan Inheritance

28th November 2019
English Law under Two Elizabeths: The Elizabethan Inheritance

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: The Chancellor's Hall, First Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

London Hamlyn Lecture 2020

Delivered by Professor Sir John Baker, Q.C., LL.B., Ph.D. (Lond.), M.A., LL.D. (Cantab.), Hon. LL.D. (Chicago), F.B.A.; Downing Professor Emeritus of the Laws of England in the University of Cambridge

The third Hamlyn lecture will look back from the present. Much of the common law of contract and tort still rests on Elizabethan foundations. So do the principles of administrative law. The criminal law still includes some major common-law offences, such as murder and manslaughter; it is less severe, but it has become deeply complicated and seemingly impossible to manage efficiently. There is more statute and more regulation, but the principal changes have been in the legal system. Debt-collection, which rarely troubles the superior courts, is essentially timeless. But contentious litigation is less often conducted between ordinary people – who can no longer afford it – and more typically takes the form of vertical claims against authority. Civil juries have gone and the law courts are less familiar to the general public than 350 years ago; procedure is more arcane, and the law is arguably even less intelligible. The lectures will end with the question of what has been gained and lost since the first Elizabethan age.

This is the 3rd and final 2020 Hamlyn Lecture.  The first two are being hosted by the University of Cambridge on 19 November and the University of Reading on 21 November.  Further information is available on the Hamlyn website  

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Sat 30 November, 2019
Henderson Chambers Pupillage Forum 2019

30th November 2019
Henderson Chambers Pupillage Forum 2019

Event Time: 3:30-6pm

Venue: Henderson Chambers, Temple, London EC4Y 9DB

Henderson Chambers are holding a Pupillage Forum to meet future pupillage applicants. We want to get to know you, and we want to give you a chance to get to know us. We hope to introduce you to Chambers and to our Pupillage.Members of Chambers are currently instructed in the Grenfell Tower Fire, the VW Emissions litigation, Nigerian oil spills, and the Seroxat group action, as well as many other high profile and complex cases.

See flyer for full details on how to attend.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 19 September, 2019
Sat 30 November, 2019
National Pupillage Fair

30th November 2019
National Pupillage Fair

Event Time: 10:30-3pm

Venue: The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn 8 South Square London WC1R 5ET

Back for 2019, the TARGETjobs Law National Pupillage Fair is taking place at the prestigious Honourable Society of Gray’s Inn on Saturday 30 November.

Open to students and graduates interested in discovering more about life at the Bar, the UK's largest and most established National Pupillage Fair is the best opportunity for students looking for pupillage to...

  • Gain an exclusive behind the scenes look at Gray's Inn

  • Meet with and speak to a variety of chambers and course providers

  • Have your questions answered to gain an insight into life at the Bar

  • Listen to a programme of talks covering key topics

  • Pick up your all-important copy of the TARGETjobs Law Pupillages Handbook

  • Discover what life as a barrister is really like, make new contacts and get ahead in your law career!

Apply for tickets via Eventbrite

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 19 September, 2019
Mon 2 December, 2019
The Rights of Aliens under International Law: towards a critical history

2nd December 2019
The Rights of Aliens under International Law: towards a critical history

Event Time: 6:30-8pm

Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building

The Annual Human Rights Day Lecture hosted by LSE Human Rights will be delivered this year by Professor Antony Anghie of the University of Utah.

Antony Anghie is the Samuel D. Thurman Professor of Law at S.J. Quinney School of Law, University of Utah. He received a B.A. and an LL.B. from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He earned an S.J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he also served as a MacArthur Scholar at the Harvard Center for International Affairs and a Senior Fellow in the Graduate Program at the law school. In the summer of 1994, he completed an internship with the International Monetary Fund in Washington, D.C. He also practiced law in Melbourne, Australia.

Professor Anghie joined the faculty at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law faculty in 1995. He served on the University President's Task Force on Internationalization and on various other committees examining issues of internationalization at the university level. He has served as Visiting Professor at the American University Cairo, Cornell, Harvard, the London School of Economics and Political Science, and the University of Tokyo and he has also taught and lectured at various other universities around the world including Melbourne Law School, the University of Auckland, the Law College in Sri Lanka and Jahangirnagar Law School in Bangladesh. He has served on the Executive Council of the Asian Society of International Law since its founding, and was a principal organizer of its biennial conference in Beijing in 2011. He delivered the Grotius Lecture at the American Society of International Law in 2010.

Professor Anghie's research interests include public and private international law; human rights; globalization, development issues, and international law; terrorism and the use of force; international business transactions and international economic law; colonialism and the history of public international law; and third world approaches to international law

  • Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is Associate Professor in Human Rights, in the Department of Sociology and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights.

Hosted by LSE Human Rights and the Department of Sociology

Entry is free and on a first-come, first-served basis. For more info see LSE Events.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
Wed 11 December, 2019
The Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act: women's legal landmarks

11th December 2019
The Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act: women's legal landmarks

Event Time: 6-7:30pm

Venue: Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, United Kingdom (LSE)

Mari Takayanagi (Houses of Parliament) speaks on the ‘Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act’, which enabled women to join professional organisations.

In the centenary year of women’s formal admission to the legal profession, the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies has hosted a series of talks –Women Legal Landmarks – In Conversation – exploring legal landmarks for women. Such landmarks – significant achievements marking an important stage or turning point in women’s engagement with law and law reform – cover a range of topics, including the right to vote, sex discrimination, equal pay, forced marriage, prostitution, rape, twitter abuse and the ordination of women bishops as well as the life stories of a number of women who were the first to undertake key legal roles and positions.

Hosted by the LSE Library.

Book via Eventbrite.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
Thu 30 January, 2020
Can the law keep up with changes in society?

30th January 2020
Can the law keep up with changes in society?

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: Barnard's Inn Hall Holborn London EC1N 2HH

Advances in medicine allow us to sustain life for longer, but at what cost and at whose choice? Why might the court intervene when a devout Jehovah Witness parent refuses a life-saving blood transfer to their child? Where does religious devotion end and unsafe thought begin? What about cultural and spiritual beliefs that clash with UK ‘norms’? Has the law has kept up with the changing society it regulates?

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 


Find out more about the event and speaker, Professor Jo Delahunty QC via the Gresham website

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019
Thu 5 March, 2020
The insider's guide to becoming a barrister

5th March 2020
The insider's guide to becoming a barrister

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: Barnard's Inn Hall Holborn London EC1N 2HH

This lecture provides an insider’s brutally honest guide to what it's like to be a self-employed barrister - the highs and lows of the career, the work behind the scenes that makes a difference to outcomes in court, and the art of persuasion in it. 

What are the ways of working that can make a difference to success and failure, for the client and to professional development for the barrister? What transferable skills does the advocate have looking at life Beyond the Bar?

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 


Find out more about the event and the speaker, Professor Jo Delahunty QC, via the Gresham website.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019
Thu 30 April, 2020
The law is broken: the future of legal aid

30th April 2020
The law is broken: the future of legal aid

Event Time: 6-7pm

The Secret Barrister (2018), a Times bestseller, coincided with a ‘walk out’ by the Criminal Bar. A 2018 Working Lives survey conducted by the Bar Council found that barristers across England and Wales were struggling to cope with the demands of an under-resourced legal aid system. At significant cost to their health and job satisfaction, lawyers were straining to prop up a criminal and family justice system at the point of collapse. 

2018 witnessed the creation of a movement called ‘The Law Is Broken'. Has the Law been fixed?

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 


Find out more about the event and the spoeaker, Professor Jo Delahunty QC, via the Gresham website.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019
Thu 4 June, 2020
Diversity in the legal profession

4th June 2020
Diversity in the legal profession

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: Barnard's Inn Hall Holborn London EC1N 2HH

Coming to the end of her tenure as Gresham’s Professor of Law Jo Delahunty will explore what the future holds for the next generation of barristers: will they better reflect the society they serve in terms of background, ethnicity and gender? Is privilege and income as much of a division at The Bar as it is in society? 

What can institutions such as Universities, The Inns, The City, and Gresham do to reach out to students who may not have professionals in their family to open their eyes to their potential and the legal profession? Jo Delahunty's final lecture will sound the clarion call for action.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 


Find out more about the event and the speaker, Professor Jo Delahunty QC, via the Gresham website.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019
Wed 13 November, 2019
EU Powers Under External Pressure - How the EU's External Actions Alter its Internal Structures

13th November 2019
EU Powers Under External Pressure - How the EU's External Actions Alter its Internal Structures

Event Time: 5-7pm

Venue: DLG09 (Rhind Building) City, University of London Northampton Square London EC1V 0HB

Series: Institute for the Study of European Law (ISEL) 

Guest Speaker: Professor Christina Eckes, University of Amsterdam

This presentation discusses the recently published monograph on the same topic, tracing these legal effects and the broader constitutional implications, including potential integrative forces. EU external actions affect the power division between the EU and its Member States and between the different EU institutions; the unity and autonomy of the EU legal order; the role and position of Member States on the international plane; their autonomy; the relationship between national, international and EU law; and the ability of EU citizens to identify who is responsible for a particular action or policy, as well as their legitimate expectation that the EU takes action on their behalf.

Sign up for your place in advance

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Mon 16 September, 2019
Wed 13 November, 2019
Women's Legal Landmarks - In Conversation: Married Women's Property Act 1882 and 1964

13th November 2019
Women's Legal Landmarks - In Conversation: Married Women's Property Act 1882 and 1964

Event Time: 5-6pm

Venue: Room R01 at the Womens Library, (LSE Library) 4th Floor, 10 Portugal Street, London WC2A 2HD

In the centenary year of women’s formal admission to the legal profession, the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies will host a series of talks exploring legal landmarks for women. All speakers were participants in the groundbreaking Women’s Legal Landmarks Project led by Erika Rackley and Rosemary Auchmuty.

Married Women's Property Act 1882 - Andy Hayward

Married Women's Property Act 1964 - Sharon Thompson

Organised in collaboration with the University of Kent and University of Reading.

The event is free but booking via IALS required

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Thu 14 November, 2019
Wrongful Convictions and the Criminal Cases Review Commission

14th November 2019
Wrongful Convictions and the Criminal Cases Review Commission

Event Time: 6-8pm

Venue: Room 3.1, Third Floor Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) Queen Mary University of London 67-69 Lincoln's Inn Fields London WC2A 3JB

The Criminal Justice Centre, Queen Mary University has organised a discussion of: Reasons to Doubt: Wrongful Convictions and the Criminal Cases Review Commission by Carolyn Hoyle and Mai Sato (OUP 2019).

The discussion panel will consist of Professor Hoyle; Dennis Eady (Cardiff Innocence Project); Sharon Persaud (former Commissioner); and Stephanie Roberts (University of Westminster).

Find out more and book

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 19 September, 2019
Thu 14 November, 2019
Lord Upjohn Lecture 2019: From Equality and Diversity to Inclusivity and Belonging in Law

14th November 2019
Lord Upjohn Lecture 2019: From Equality and Diversity to Inclusivity and Belonging in Law

Event Time: 5:30-9pm

Venue: City Law School Atkin Building Gray's Inn London WC1R 5AT

The annual Lord Upjohn lectures reflect the focus of the ALT in promoting excellence in legal education, bringing together scholars, practitioners, policy-makers and other key stakeholders to debate and reflect on legal education discourse. Lord Upjohn was the first President of the Association of Law Teachers, serving from 1966 until his death in 1971.

The 2019 Lord Upjohn Lecture will be given by Christina Blacklaws, Immediate Past President of The Law Society of England and Wales.

 

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 18 October, 2019
Tue 19 November, 2019
Answering the Legal Questions in Interview (Hardwicke Chambers)

19th November 2019
Answering the Legal Questions in Interview (Hardwicke Chambers)

Event Time: 6-7:30pm

Venue: Atkin Building lecture theatre, City Law School, Gray's Inn

More details to come, but this event will be reserved for City BPTC students only.

Event posted by Emily on Thu 19 September, 2019
Wed 20 November, 2019
Brexit and the Irish Border: is there a way forward?

20th November 2019
Brexit and the Irish Border: is there a way forward?

Event Time: 6:30-8pm

Venue: Auditorium, Basement, Centre Building (LSE)

A discussion of possible solutions and proposed alternatives to the most important issue of the Brexit negotiations, the Irish border.

  • Conor Gearty (@conorgearty) is Professor of Human Rights Law, Department of Law, LSE.

Hosted by the European Institute and the School of Public Policy

Entry is free but tickets must be requested. See the How can I attend? link at LSE Events.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Wed 4 September, 2019
Wed 20 November, 2019
The Horizontal Effect of Fundamental Rights in the European Union: A Constitutional Analysis

20th November 2019
The Horizontal Effect of Fundamental Rights in the European Union: A Constitutional Analysis

Event Time: 5-7pm

Venue: AG07b (College Building) City, University of London Northampton Square London EC1V 0HB

Series: Institute for the Study of European Law (ISEL) 

Guest Speaker: Dr Eleni Frantziou, Durham University

This presentation will discuss the speaker's recent monograph on the horizontal effect of fundamental rights in the European Union (OUP 2019). The book argues that the horizontal effect of fundamental rights (i.e. their application to disputes between private parties) cannot be usefully analysed based on the existing EU horizontality doctrine but, rather, requires a deeper engagement with the roots of horizontality in constitutional and human rights theory. 

Places are free but please sign up in advance.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Mon 16 September, 2019
Fri 22 November, 2019
Digital Rights in Brexit: Changes and Challenges

22nd November 2019
Digital Rights in Brexit: Changes and Challenges

Event Time: 9:30 - 17:30

Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

This year’s ILPC Annual Conference and Lecture on ‘Digital Rights in Brexit: Changes and Challenges’ constitutes the Centre’s 5th annual event of this nature.  The conference seeks to consider the changes and challenges facing the protection and enjoyment of digital rights in the UK and elsewhere as a result of Brexit.

Policymakers, practitioners, industry, civil society, and leading academic experts will address and examine the key legal implications posed by Brexit to the enjoyment of digital rights in the UK and elsewhere.

Key speakers, chairs, and discussants at the Annual Conference will provide a range of national and international legal and policymaking insights from the UK and Europe including:

• Sophia Adams-Bhatti (Director of Legal and Regulatory Policy, The Law Society);
• Professor Alan Winfield (Ethical Robotics, University of the West of England, Bristol);
• Professor John Naughton (Senior Fellow, University of Cambridge);
• Roger Taylor, Director of Centre for Digital Ethics and Innovation, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS);
• Ali Shah (Head of Technology Policy, Information Commissioner’s Office);
• Professor Hamed Haddadi (Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College London);
• Dr Adrian Weller, (Head of AI Research, Alan Turing Institute; Senior Fellow, University of Cambridge);
• Professor Orla Lynskey (Department of Law, LSE); and
• Dr Jay Fedorak, Jersey Information Commissioner.

Whether based on doctrinal analysis, or empirical research, the conference will explore original perspectives on the implications posed by Brexit. This scope covers both the impact on digital rights of an impending Brexit since the 2016 referendum to date, as well as the potential consequences for digital rights on leaving the EU for all individuals resident in the UK.

Topics of discussion include:

• online harms and the regulation of social media;
• surveillance and data privacy;
• data protection law and data transfers;
• AI, data ethics and innovation;
• employment and labour; and
• the rule of law and public international law.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Mon 25 November, 2019
#MeToo: Past and Present

25th November 2019
#MeToo: Past and Present

Event Time: 6pm

Venue: ELG01 Drysdale Building City, University of London Northampton Square London EC1V 0HB

A panel organised by the Gender & Sexualities Research Centre at City with Karen Boyle (Strathclyde) Julie Wheelwright (City) and respondents Sarah Banet-Weiser (LSE) and Jack Bratich (Rutgers)

Our speakers will discuss #MeToo in long historical perspective, from Mata Hari to contemporary media.

Karen Boyle, On silence breaking

In December 2017, Time magazine named the “Silence Breakers” – the women, and some men, speaking out about sexual harassment – their “person” of the year. This paper re-considers mediatized silence breaking in relation to a longer history of feminist speak outs, and critically examines the way in which feminism (and feminists) featured both in the 2017 stories and in Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey’s subsequent account of breaking the Weinstein story in She Said.

Julie Wheelwright, From Mata Hari to #MeToo: Reflections on Seduction, Harassment and Sexual Shame

A few months before the New York Times broke the story about Harvey Weinstein paying off his accusers for decades in 2017, a new publication of Mata Hari’s letters provided a historic perspective on the sexual harassment of female performers. Coinciding with the centenary of Margaretha Zelle MacLeod’s execution on espionage charges by the French on 15 October 1917, this presentation explores the contemporary relevance of her rejection of victimhood and sexual shame.

About the speakers

Karen Boyle is Professor of Feminist Media Studies at the University of Strathclyde. She is author of Media and Violence: Gendering the Debates (Sage) and Everyday Pornography (Routledge). Her new book #MeToo, Weinstein and Feminism is out soon with Palgrave.

Julie Wheelwright is Director of the Creative Writing MA at City and author of The Fatal Lover: Mata Hari and the Myth of Women in Espionage (Harper Collins) and Amazons and Military Maids: Women Who Dressed as Men in Pursuit of Life, Liberty and Happiness (Pandora).

Sarah Banet-Weiser is Professor and Head of the Dept of Media and Communications at LSE. Her most recent book is Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny (Duke) and the article ‘From Pick-Up Artists to Incels: Con(fidence) Games, Networked Misogyny and the Failure of Neoliberalism’ with Jack Bratich

Jack Bratich is Associate Professor of Journalism & Media Studies at Rutgers. His work on social media and social theory includes the book Conspiracy Panics: Political Rationality and Popular Culture (SUNY).

Free event but you need to book via City Events.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Tue 26 November, 2019
ILPC Evening Seminar: Digital Justice: Convenience at What Cost?

26th November 2019
ILPC Evening Seminar: Digital Justice: Convenience at What Cost?

Event Time: 5:30-7pm

Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

In the midst of broad modernisation reforms within the UK courts and court services, this seminar seeks to generate insight and thinking into the impact such reforms may have on equality, fairness and access to justice. Such reforms include the provision of online and virtual courts, particularly for small civil claims. One of the key underlying rationales behind these reforms are to relieve the current burden on UK civil courts, which currently deal with around two million cases a year, as well as the drop in provisions of legal aid as a result of austerity measures. However, the use of digital technologies in the justice sector has not always been fair, as witnessed with systems like Compass in the US which displayed racial discrimination and bias in adjudicating bail recidivism. In light of such concerns, this seminar seeks to engage with the challenges to access, equality and fairness, that the broad modernisation reforms to the UK courts and justice system could potentially cause. We hope to consider issues such as: Do we know enough about the potential impact on marginalised communities and vulnerable individuals of digital justice to move forward so quickly with such reforms? What effects might online courts have for the legal profession? How can we ensure that the provision of such services remain transparent and open? 

Panelist:

Gill Phillips, Director of Editorial Legal Services, Guardian News and Media
Dr Judith Townend, Senior Lecturer in Media and Information Law, University of Sussex
Community; Public Engagement Lead for Law, Politics and Sociology; and Deputy Director, Sussex Centre for Information Governance Research.
Dr Joe Tomlinson, Senior Lecturer in Public Law, University of York; Research Director, Public Law Project.
Dr Kate Leader, Lecturer in Law, University of York

Chair:

Dr Nora Ni Loideain, Director and Lecturer in Law, Information Law and Policy Centre,  Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London. 

 

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Fri 4 October, 2019
Thu 18 June, 2020
Terrorism, National Security and the Law

18th June 2020
Terrorism, National Security and the Law

Event Time: 6-7pm

Venue: Barnard's Inn Hall Holborn London EC1N 2HH

THE 2020 ANNUAL GRAY'S INN READING

The Lord Carlile of Berriew CBE, QC, FRSA is a barrister and member of the House of Lords, and from 2001-2011 acted as the UK's Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation. He will be speaking on terrorism, national security and the law.

Reservations Required

Tickets will be available from 10am on Friday 17th April

Find out more about the event and the speaker, Lord Carlile of Berriew QC via the Gresham website.

[External Link]

Event posted by Emily on Thu 29 August, 2019

Databases

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Database Support Materials

i-law

i-law is THE database for those interested in maritime and commercial law. At City we subscribe to the Maritime and Insurance & Reinsurance modules.

Prime resources include Lloyds Law Reports and the Lloyds Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly.

This database requires an individual username and password - ask your library for this.

Need extra help? Check out the guide and videos.

LexisLibrary

Lexis is an immense database with access to cases, legislation and journal articles. Practitioner texts are also available, including Blackstones Criminal Practice, Lester & Pannick: Human Rights Law and Practice, Paget's Law of Banking, Whish: Competition Law amongst 149 others.

You can also access really monster Lexis publications - Halsbury's Laws (the legal encyclopedia) and Halsbury's Statutes amongst them.

Law report-wise you can find many key series in LNB: All England Law Reports (All ER), The Law Reports (AC, QB, Ch etc), Times Law Reports (TLR) amongst others.

Access using your IT username and password.

Need extra help? Kristina Voronenko is your LexisNexis Student Associate and can provide online research support to students and staff.
 

Westlaw

Westlaw is a huge database containing cases, legislation and journal articles. Searching for cases within Westlaw is a joy, particularly thanks to the Case Analysis function. This cool tool almost does your research for you, listing lots of extra stuff about a case; its history, where its been cited subsequently and, best of all, all the journal articles which talk about your case.

Law report series included in Westlaw include the Weekly Law Reports (WLR), The Law Reports (AC, QB, Ch etc), Fleet Street Reports (FSR), Common Market Law Reports (CMLR) and Housing Law Reports amongst others.

The journal collection is admirable; including the Conveyancer (Conv), Criminal Law Review (Crim L.R.), European Law Review (E.L.Rev), Law Quarterly Review (LQR), Oxford Journal of Legal Studies (OJLS) and Public Law (P.L.) as well as loads more...

 

 

HeinOnline

HeinOnline is an American database which offers access to a huge number of journals. Unlike Lexis or Westlaw it generally offers full coverage of journal titles, ie. from volume 1, issue 1.

It offers a wide selection of American Journals with extensive coverage, eg. Harvard Law Review (1887-), Yale Law Journal (1891-).

Its collection of English journals is growing and key ones to remember are as follows: Cambridge Law Journal (1921-), Industrial Law Journal (1972-1997), International and Comparative Law Quarterly (1952-), Law Quarterly Review (1885-), Legal Studies (1981-)

Access using your IT username and password.

There's a Hein App now too - http://home.heinonline.org/heinonline-app/

All databases require a City Law School student account for access. If you have trouble using a database, please email the Law Library or use the helpdesk form.

Electronic Journals, Reports and Texts

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All the e-journals, reports and texts available to City Law School students are collected on our separate E-texts Library where they are freely searchable and sortable according to many different categories and keywords.

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